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Career Exploration

Investigate careers and find those that are a good match to you.

Step 3

decideApply deeper career exploration techniques to their top 3-5 career priorities.

Majors and Careers

Wise Choice

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Real World Career Exploration for Deeper Learning

Many Students are challenged from the moment they enter college to answer the questions "What is your major?" and "What career are you going to choose?"  In order to make a career decision that is right for you, you must engage in a career decision-making process.  This process is:

  • A process that takes time. You cannot make a good decision until you have adequate information about yourself and the world of work, of self knowledge and information gathering, as well as having experiences that point you in a direction that is right for you.
  • A proactive process. No one can tell you what you should do, and a career decisions will not appear through thin air. You must take the time and the effort to engage in actions that will help you to make decisions. You must also be self-reflective about these activities. You cannot just take in information, you must reflect on how this information fits with your own interests, values and skills. There are things that you can do to increase your chances of making a decision that is right for you.
  • Not a linear process. While there are specific steps that can be taken, there is no specific order in which these steps should be taken, and you may repeat steps throughout the process.

Here are some tips to keep in mind:

  1. Examine your motivation for engaging in the process. Many students will begin the process because they feel pressured by others (e.g.,parents, peers, advisors), or because they in some way feel that they are "behind". Your journey must come from a genuine desire to engage in self discovery.
  2. Challenge any myths you have about the career decision-making process.
  3. Be open to new experiences and ideas. We only see or hear about a few careers fields on a day to day basis. New careers are being created every day. In addition don't be afraid to experiment with new roles in student groups, the classroom, or at work to discover new information about your skills and interests.

Source:

Career Decision-Making Links